12th October 2022

Fake watch seller to serve time

A Falkirk man known locally as the ‘King of Fakes’ has received a 15-month jail sentence.


By JTS Staff
Journal of Trading Standards' in-house team
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We’re committed to finding and prosecuting those who persist in this illegal activity

An investigation by Falkirk Council Trading Standards has resulted in a prison sentence for a man known locally as the ‘King of Fakes’ who sold counterfeit items online.

Conroy Lindsay (37) of Bonnybridge sold fake watches, fragrances, shoes, clothing and handbags between 2017 and 2019. He came to the attention of Falkirk Trading Standards after he posted listings on online selling platform Gumtree advertising watches. He also advertised products on social media platforms such as Instagram.

A subsequent test purchase revealed the items advertised to be counterfeit, and Lindsay’s home was raided.

Officers found numerous fake items, including products that were likely to be mistaken for high-end brands including Rolex, Ray Ban, Christian Louboutin, Hublot, Omega, Givenchy, Fendi, Louis Vuitton and Tag Heuer.

The counterfeit items had been sourced from Chinese companies. Had they been real, they would have been worth £650,145 on the UK market.

Lindsay was sentenced to 15 months in jail at Falkirk Sheriff Court on 25 August after pleading guilty to offences under the Trade Marks Act 1994.

He was identified following a Scotland-wide project to identify consumer protection and intellectual property crimes on social media platforms and marketplaces.

Kirstie Crosson, Falkirk Council Trading Standards Co-ordinator, said: “This conviction is another warning to those involved in the sale of illicit goods. “We’re committed to finding and prosecuting those who persist in this illegal activity.

“Counterfeit goods are unsafe, unreliable and harm legitimate businesses. We take the supply of such goods seriously and we’ll do everything in our power to tackle the supply to protect our residents.”

Counterfeit goods are often unsafe as they are produced without regard to safety standards. There are also known links between the sale and supply of counterfeit goods, and organised crime.

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